As many as 15 percent of freshmen at America’s top schools are white students who failed to meet their university’s minimum standards for admission, according to Peter Schmidt, deputy editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education. These kids are “people with a long-standing relationship with the university,” or in other words, the children of faculty, wealthy alumni and politicians.

According to Schmidt, these unqualified but privileged kids are nearly twice as common on top campuses as Black and Latino students who had benefited from affirmative action.

Ten myths about affirmative action (via linzyxxxxx)

This is EXTREMELY blatant on college campuses. The fact that these things need to be clarified is sad.

(via newwavefeminism)

Legacy is the real affirmative action…and yet we don’t see certain types of entitled people suing to dismantle that.

(via invisiblelad)

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts
kitslam:

Sacred Geometry

kitslam:

Sacred Geometry

codyjohnston:

At least six of my friends have shared this Ferguson article, and it has all but disappeared from my Facebook feed. Similar thing happening to a buddy of mine. Then Facebook tags my post “Joan Rivers”. Something is wrong.

codyjohnston:

At least six of my friends have shared this Ferguson article, and it has all but disappeared from my Facebook feed. Similar thing happening to a buddy of mine. Then Facebook tags my post “Joan Rivers”. Something is wrong.

stephenhawqueen:

the US is unreal like girls cant wear shorts to school, you can literally lose your job for being gay, and unarmed black children are brutally murdered on the regular but old white ppl r still like “what a beautiful country. i can freely carry a gun for no reason and some of our mountains look like presidents. god bless”

During slavery, it was commonly propounded that the whites were both smarter and stronger than blacks. There were even faux concerns that if slavery were abolished, the black race would die out, unable to survive on its own. Once slavery ended, however, things changed. The ‘happy docile slave stereotype’ (there were always multiple variants) was replaced by the predator/rapist, whose purported presence served to justify wave upon wave of lynching epidemics.

What these examples show is how fluid racist ideologies can be under pressure, and yet still fulfill their same basic function of justifying and naturalizing racially stratified outcomes. The book ‘Social Dominance: An Intergroup Theory of Social Hierarchy and Oppression’ explains how stratified societies maintain themselves with a mixture of hierarchy-enhancing and hierarchy-attenuating ideas, values and ‘legitimating myths,’ which can vary over time, but still continued to produce stratified outcomes provided newer legitimating myths emerge to support hierarchy, as the older ones fall out of favor.

In America as a whole, perhaps the most useful framework for understanding this process in the so-called post-civil rights era is Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s concept of ‘colorblind racism,’ as explained in his 2003 book, ‘Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States.’ While the idea of a ‘colorblind’ social order was, in the 19th century, a relatively radical, emancipatory idea, more recently the notion has been turned upside down, with the claim that we are already colorblind, except, perhaps, for those who still see racial injustices. The concept of ‘colorblind racism’ neatly captures what’s involved in this shell game.

'The central component of any dominant racial ideology is its frames or set paths for interpreting information,' Bonilla-Silva explained, and he identified four such frames at the heart of colorblind racism: 1) Abstract Liberalism, using ideas associated with political liberalism (such as 'equal opportunity,' the idea that force should not be used to achieve social policy) and economic liberalism (choice, individualism) — in an abstract manner to explain racial matters. 2) Naturalization ('That’s just how things are.') 3) Cultural Racism (arguments like 'Mexicans don’t put much emphasis on education' or 'Blacks have too many babies'to explain the condition of minorities.) 4) Minimization of Racism, which simultaneously acknowledges and dismisses persistent racism ('It’s better now than in the past' or 'There is discrimination, but there are plenty of jobs out there').

With this framework as background, it’s not hard to understand the evolution of even more pernicious extremist variants in the right-wing media, which Boehlert sketched out. It began with Andrew Breitbart and his website announcing that ‘basically racism had been eradicated, and that anyone who talked about the topic was therefore a racist,’ especially ‘civil rights activists and civil libertarians … because by raising questions, or talking about it, or discussing it, they were trying to rip the country apart, because the country is already solved racism.’

black-american-queen:

OK. I KNOW YOU ARE ALL WORRIED ABOUT FERGUSON BUT CAN YOU FOR A SECOND LOOK AT THIS VICTOR WHITE CASE?

NOTHING ADDS UP.

APPARENTLY AFTER BEING SEARCHED TWICE (while handcuffed) HE PRODUCED A GUN AT THE POLICE STATION AND SHOT HIMSELF. HIS DEATH HAS BEEN RULED A SUICIDE.

YOU NEED TO SPREAD THIS TUMBLR. BECAUSE THIS IS BULLSHIT AND THE COPS ARE COVERING IT UP.

codyjohnston:

I’ve been pretty silent for the past few days, which may have pleased many of you who are like, “Cut the Ferguson shit, just give me jokes.” The main reason I haven’t posted anything is because I’ve been working on a column about Ferguson, so tomorrow you’ll get both. Ferguson shit, and jokes.

In…

eat-my-sanity:

thisshitfunny:

thatdudeemu:

queerasfuck88:

Jon Stewart Goes After Fox in Powerful Ferguson Monologue

I been waiting for the daily show to come back so they could cover this

Jon rip them boys a new asshole 

Race is there and it is constant. You’re tired of hearing about it? Imagine how fucking exhausting it is living it. 

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

phosphorescentt:

septemberism94:

why test on animals when there are prisons full of rapists

because the prisons aren’t actually full of rapists

the rapists run free and the prisons are full of people charged with weed possession

Dumbass Officer Wilson supporter: “Why doesn’t anyone protest when a black man kills a white man?” Uhhh maybe because the black man will get arrested in .5 seconds, meanwhile, officer Wilson is probably going to get off scot-free?
Anonymous

yoisthisracist:

Yeah, the racist assholes supporting fucks like Darren Wilson seem to truly be too stupid to understand this difference.

profkew:

PHOTOGRAPH BY RUDDY ROYE
Between the World and Ferguson by Jelani Cobb

When I was eighteen, I stumbled across Richard Wright’s poem “Between the World and Me.” The poem, a retelling of a lynching, shook me, because while the narrator relays the details in the first person, the actual victim of that brutish ritual is another man, unknown to him and unknown to us. The poem is about the way in which history is an animate force, and how we are witnesses to the past, even to that portion of it that transpired before we were born. He writes,


    darkness screamed with thirsty voices; and the witnesses rose and lived:The dry bones stirred, rattled, lifted, melting themselvesinto my bones.The grey ashes formed flesh firm and black, entering intomy flesh.
Nothing save random fortune separated the fate of the man who died from that of the one telling the story. Errin Whack and Isabel Wilkerson have both written compellingly about the long shadow of lynching. It is, too often, a deliberately forgotten element of the American past—one that is nonetheless felt everywhere in Ferguson, Missouri, where protests followed the shooting of Michael Brown, who was eighteen years old, by a police officer. One can’t make sense of how Brown’s community perceived those events without first understanding the way that neglected history has survived among black people—a traumatic memory handed down, a Jim Crow inheritance.
Read more.

profkew:

PHOTOGRAPH BY RUDDY ROYE

Between the World and Ferguson by Jelani Cobb

When I was eighteen, I stumbled across Richard Wright’s poem “Between the World and Me.” The poem, a retelling of a lynching, shook me, because while the narrator relays the details in the first person, the actual victim of that brutish ritual is another man, unknown to him and unknown to us. The poem is about the way in which history is an animate force, and how we are witnesses to the past, even to that portion of it that transpired before we were born. He writes,

    darkness screamed with thirsty voices; and the witnesses rose and lived:
The dry bones stirred, rattled, lifted, melting themselves
into my bones.
The grey ashes formed flesh firm and black, entering into
my flesh.

Nothing save random fortune separated the fate of the man who died from that of the one telling the story. Errin Whack and Isabel Wilkerson have both written compellingly about the long shadow of lynching. It is, too often, a deliberately forgotten element of the American past—one that is nonetheless felt everywhere in Ferguson, Missouri, where protests followed the shooting of Michael Brown, who was eighteen years old, by a police officer. One can’t make sense of how Brown’s community perceived those events without first understanding the way that neglected history has survived among black people—a traumatic memory handed down, a Jim Crow inheritance.

Read more.

nowyoukno:

Source for more breaking news follow NowYouKno

nowyoukno:

Source for more breaking news follow NowYouKno